Sunday, February 18, 2018

Re: morning headache, increased BP, no snoring/choking/waking, could still be sleep apnea, doctors may not diagnose correctly

"Here's a short list of documented symptoms of sleep apnea: 

Fatigue 
Headache 
Choking 
Myocardial infarction. 
Hypertension 
Stroke 
Arrhythmias/Dysrhythmias 
Bradycardia/Tachycardia 
Heartburn/GERD 
Poor memory 
Depression 
Insomnia 
Snoring 
Night Sweats 
Nocturia – Frequent nighttime urination 
Erectile dysfunction 

There are others as well. These are some of the most common. Apnea is truly a systemic malady which produces such a vast array of symptoms that physicians have neither fully documented nor fully explored the extent of its involvement with these and other symptoms."

On Wed, Feb 14, 2018 at 4:14 PM Connie L. O'Dell <odellconnie@gmail.com> wrote:
If you wake up with headaches sometimes, you may have sleep apnea, even if you do not snore or choke or wake up.  The only visible sign may be silent breathing pauses during sleep.  Do not assume your doctor will ask you the right questions to find out if this is your problem.  The high blood pressure I have had for 10 years with the headaches is potentially another symptom, and my doctor never asked.  I was diagnosed because: 1) My husband saw me stopping breathing/breathing very shallowly, and 2) I used a cheap pulse-oximeter from amazon.com that has an alarm that goes off when you have low oxygen, and taped it on my hand overnight, and sure enough, it showed drops to 85% and even 80%.  Immediately my doctor approved a sleep study to officially diagnose apnea.  In case you don't know, sleep apnea over time leads to multiple organ failure, hear attacks, and reduced brain function, which I *do not* need...  ;-) and is extremely hereditary, so my siblings should suspect it also.  I would like to think CPAP and more oxygen will fix my lifelong brain farts, but I'd be happy to just not to get (much) fartier, too...

--

Friday, February 16, 2018

Packing for Italy in April, thanks to Rick Steves bboard

"

Packing for Italy trip in April

 

Hi there - 

Looking for advise on packing for 10 days in Venice, Florence and Rome the first 2 weeks in April. We will be traveling between the cities via train. What should we bring (hubby and I)? I'm not great at packing light so looking for some advise.

Thank you!

 Posted by acraven
Washington DC
6937 posts

There isn't one right answer to this sort of question, just a bunch of no-doubt-varying suggestions. Here are mine.

I don't think you need to worry about hot weather at that time of year, even in Rome. I've had coolish, wet weather in Venice and Florence even in late May and early September, so preparing for that would be my priority. I do laundry in my room periodically and would take approximately this (which includes what I would wear on the plane).

  • 3 pairs of slacks. Mix-and-match with tops to maximum degree possible; take what you already own. One dress would replace one pair of slacks and one top.
  • approximately 5 tops, probably all long-sleeved, maybe 2 turtlenecks.
  • 1 pair longjohn bottoms (Walmart has a cheap line of Cuddl Duds). Some might substitute tights.
  • 1 longjohn top only if you are cold-natured and the last-minute weather report doesn't look good. You can't easily take this off if you're too hot indoors.
  • 5 changes of underwear/socks.
  • 2 or 3 bras.
  • 1 warm layer (could be merino wool sweater, fleece jacket, scrunchable/packable down jacket--or perhaps just a vest, wool jacket, etc.--there should be something in your closet that would be fine). Try for something that is easy to carry around when you don't need it for warmth. I have a boiled wool jacket, but it's pretty bulky.
  • 1 waterproof or at least water-repellant layer that will fit over the warm layer. This will also serve as a windbreaker. If the weather report is really grim (cold and much rain expected), I'd consider a full-length raincoat or quality poncho, but those are a royal pain to drag around when you don't need to wear them.
  • hat/headgear, ideally at least water-repellant. Consider that it may be windy, too, so umbrellas may not be too helpful, and unsecured hats may blow off your head.
  • gloves if last-minute weather forecast suggests temps will be low enough you'll want them.
  • scarf if you are so inclined.
  • supportive, broken-in walking shoes with grippy soles that will be safe on wet cobblestones. I wear nothing but lace-ups, but some people manage with other styles. Waterproof or not is something worth thinking about. Cold wet feet are no fun, but it may not be that cold, or that wet. Breathable waterproof shoes are expensive.
  • other shoes if you must (I take only one pair for summer-long trips, but I don't dress up). If your shoes are not waterproof and are not the type to dry quickly, you probably should have some sort of second pair.

The shoes are critical. If you're cold, you can buy a sweater in Italy. Finding a good pair of shoes is a much more complex (and probably costly) process. If you opt for style over comfort when you pack, you will regret it. You will be walking and standing on very hard surfaces, possibly for 8 hours on some days. Sore feet and lower-back pain are a real risk if you don't wear good shoes that are right for your feet. There is no perfect brand/model of shoe that is right for everyone. You may already have shoes that will be fine if you do a lot of walking at home.

To keep the weight of your luggage down, be ruthless about the toiletries and cosmetics you pack. Decant things into bottles that are just large enough for the length of your trip. Your hotels will almost certainly provide at least hand soap and shampoo. They likely will not provide washcloths, so you'll each need one of those. I take something colorful so it doesn't get mixed in with the hotel's lines (which will probably be white).

There are other handy-to-have things that we can suggest to you, but I'm focusing here on the things we all take, to one degree or another."


https://community.ricksteves.com/travel-forum/packing/packing-for-italy-trip-in-april

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

morning headache, increased BP, no snoring/choking/waking, could still be sleep apnea, doctors may not diagnose correctly

If you wake up with headaches sometimes, you may have sleep apnea, even if you do not snore or choke or wake up.  The only visible sign may be silent breathing pauses during sleep.  Do not assume your doctor will ask you the right questions to find out if this is your problem.  The high blood pressure I have had for 10 years with the headaches is potentially another symptom, and my doctor never asked.  I was diagnosed because: 1) My husband saw me stopping breathing/breathing very shallowly, and 2) I used a cheap pulse-oximeter from amazon.com that has an alarm that goes off when you have low oxygen, and taped it on my hand overnight, and sure enough, it showed drops to 85% and even 80%.  Immediately my doctor approved a sleep study to officially diagnose apnea.  In case you don't know, sleep apnea over time leads to multiple organ failure, hear attacks, and reduced brain function, which I *do not* need...  ;-) and is extremely hereditary, so my siblings should suspect it also.  I would like to think CPAP and more oxygen will fix my lifelong brain farts, but I'd be happy to just not to get (much) fartier, too...

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Role of zinc in regulation of arterial blood pressure and in the etiopathogenesis of arterial hypertension

Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 117, Issue 1–3, pp 39–51| Cite as

Role of zinc in regulation of arterial blood pressure and in the etiopathogenesis of arterial hypertension

Article

Abstract

Increased gastrointestinal absorption and urinary excretion of zinc has been confirmed in experimental and clinical studies on primary arterial hypertension as a result from changes of intracellular and extracellular zinc content. In arterial hypertension, the levels of zinc in serum, lymphocyte, and bone decrease while increasing in heart, erythrocytes, kidney, liver, suprarenal glands and spleen. These changes result in the loss of zinc homeostasis that leads to various degrees of deficiency, not entirely compensated by nutritional factors or increased absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Loss of zinc homeostasis can be both cause and effect of high blood pressure. In the present review, the role of zinc metabolism changes and its mechanisms in arterial hypertension are discussed.

Index entries

Zinc blood pressure arterial hypertension 

Friday, February 9, 2018

Diamox and altitude sickness

"Acetazolamide (Diamox®) has a long history of use in the treatment of the common eye disease, glaucoma. It has also been shown to be very effective in preventing or lessening symptoms of AMS. The newer dosing recommendation is 3-5 mg/kg/day in two divided doses, about 125 mg twice a day for adults. Start the night before reaching altitude. This small dose is usually effective and results in minimal side effects. The most commonly reported side effects are the sensation of mild tingling of the finger tips and the causing of carbonated beverages to taste strangely flat.

This dosage may be less than enough for larger patients, thus a third dose may be taken mid day or during the night if headache or other symptoms appear. Most people acclimate within three to four days, though AMS may reappear on later trips to that altitude.

Treatment of AMS after the unset of symptoms may require acetazolamide 250 mg twice a day. Higher dosages can cause lightheadedness and an uncomfortable pins and needle tingling around the mouth, fingers tips and toes. Analgesics, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or aspirin are helpful for headache. Keeping properly hydrated is important.

Acetazolamide appears to be safe in children of all ages at 3 mg/kg/day in two divided doses.

Acetazolamide is a very mild diuretic and increases urine output. If you are on a diuretic, such as furosemide (Lasix®) or HCTZ (hydrochlorothiazide) do not decrease or stop them, as the diuretic effect of acetazolamide is small.

IT IS A SULFA DRUG , the use of acetazolamide has been discouraged in people with known allergy to sulfa antibiotics. Recent literature indicates that there may be no increased allergic risk with non-antibiotic sulfa drugs, such as acetazolamide. ("Absence of Cross-reactivity Between Sulfonamide Antibiotics and Sulfonamide Nonantibiotics." NEJM 2003; 349(17):1628-1635.) It is a category C drug and not recommended in pregnancy or breast feeding due to lack of safety studies. It is not recommended in those with kidney failure.

Local guides and pharmacies generally encourage only coca leaves and soroche pills (Sorojchi pills). You may have difficulty finding acetazolamide in Cuzco or other cities of the Andes.

Steroids have been shown to be very effective in prevention and treatment of AMS. Adults are usually given dexamethasone 4 mg (Decadron®) every six hours. Children will respond to lower doses. Short term use is considered safe, but this medicine can cause significant blood sugar elevation in diabetics. As a preventative, this medication is prescribed for those that can not take acetazolamide.

Climbing expeditions higher than routine tourist destinations should carry dexamethasone to treat severe AMS, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE).

AMS is not the same as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) or high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). These are two serious and life threatening conditions that require urgent medical attention.

HAPE is fluid build up in the lungs marked by increasing shortness of breath and associated with persistent cough, severe headache, confusion and finally collapse. It should be treated with immediate descent, oxygen and diuretics.

HACE is swelling of the brain whose hallmark is difficulty thinking, causing disorientation, confusion and collapse. It should be treated with immediate descent to lower altitude, oxygen, diuretics and steroids.

Questionable treatments for AMS:

Salmeterol (Advair®) comes as a dry powder to inhale by mouth using a specially designed inhaler for the treatment of asthma and COPD. It has shown some effect in HAPE in only one study. It has not been studied in AMS and should not be relied upon.

Nifedipine (Procardia®) is used chiefly for treatment of angina and hypertension but has shown slight effect in HAPE, as have Cialis® and Viagra® which are used to treat erectile dysfunction.

Captopril (Capoten®) is being offered to tourist for treatment of AMS. Both nifedipine and captopril are potent drugs for lowering blood pressure and may cause fainting. Neither drug has studies that show them effective in AMS nor should they be relied upon.

Ginkgo biloba

Tibetan ginseng also known as Hong Jin Tian, or the "red view of heaven" is a tea made from rhodiola, a common plant in cold mountainous regions.

Sorojchi High Altitude pills are a combination of acetylsalicylic acid, salophen and caffeine. Basically this would be similar to aspirin with caffeine. ASPIRIN CAN MAKE YOU BLEED- MAKES PLATELETS LESS STICKY ,... CAFFEINE MAKES YOUR HEART GO FASTER, MAKES YOU URINATE MORE AND DEHYDRATES YOU

Mate de Coca known as Infusion de Coca is a tea made from coca leaves and at best is a mild stimulant. It is illegal to bring coca leaves into the US. Use of coca leaves may result in a positive urine drug screen for cocaine.

Coramina glucosa is called the Peruvian favorite for AMS."

From: 

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/forums/americas-south-america/peru/can-i-buy-diamox-easily-in-peru


--

Friday, February 2, 2018

win 10 1709 update KB4056892 install fails with error 0x80070bc2 - Microsoft Community

"
There are reports of the patch saying its failed, but its actually installed. 

Press Windows key + R 
Type: appwiz.cpl 
Hit Enter 
Click View installed updates 

See if KB4056892 is installed or not. 

You can try installing it manually if its not installed. 

If you still experience problems installing it. 


I recommend you block it until the next cumulative update is released. Many are reporting the same problem too and it looks like this update is buggy. 

Is there an option or work around to block updates or hardware drivers that might cause problems? 
Yes, Microsoft has released a KB update (KB3073930) that will let users block or hide Windows or driver updates. 

You can download it at the following link: 
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3073930 

or 

http://download.microsoft.com/download/f/2/2/f2... 

After downloading, launch it, click Next, wait while it detects pending Windows Updates. 

Click the Hide Updates menu. 

Scroll through the list then select then select the update. Check the box next to the update then click Next to confirm changes.
Best,
Andre
Windows Insider MVP
MVP-Windows and Devices for IT
twitter/adacosta
groovypost.com

"

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-update/win-10-1709-update-kb4056892-error-0x80070bc2/617f1d17-34d8-471c-936c-e06daeec145b